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Can my Sterling Silver be Repaired?

September 4, 2009

Today we take a look at the processes involved in turning a Old Master fork mashed and beaten by a drain disposal back to its original state.  At Beverly Bremer Silver Shop we employ two highly skilled polishers, who together possess over 36 years of experience!  I will take you step by step through the process of fixing one simple piece of sterling silver flatware, a salad fork.

Step 1:  A customer comes into the store shopping as usual and during checkout she asks about fixing a fork that she had brought with her.  Sara, a sales associate, takes the piece and looks it over and tells the customer that she will ask the polishers to see what they can do! 

The Old Master fork pictured below, is handed to Haile, a veteran polisher, who is asked if he can fix this disposal damaged fork?

He responds with confidence, “Yes, I can fix this, as the pattern on the handle has minimal damage!”

Step 2:  Haile moves quickly to his work bench where he asseses the damage.  In a moment, he pulls out a plastic tool that resembles a small pipe, slowly and carefully he reshapes the tines to make them straight enough to hammer out into shape. 

 
 Step 3:  After the tines have been straightened by hand, he manipulates the rest of the imperfections using a plastic hammer, working on a molded spoon shaped piece connected to a vice.  To watch his quick hands make the malformed fork into a perfect piece of art again, was a sight to see.  Meticulously he fixed the outside dents and dings by working each piece of metal.  In just a few minutes the fork began to take a recognizable form.
 
 
Step 4: Using a polishing wheel with several assorted brushes and waxes, Haile works out the minor dings and scratches again, moving so fast that his hands seem to be flawlessly one with the machine.  The damage on the fork slowly disappeared until all that was left was the resin from polishing. 
 
 
Step 5:  Finally, he buffs the most lustrous metal in the world into a perfect shine, flawless and beautiful.
 
 
Step 6:  Sara picks up the fork from Haile in the polishing room with only 7 minutes of elapsed time.  Sara thanks Haile with a big smile and he responds, “No problem Sara!”
 
 
From beginning to end, the skilled expertise of the polisher using his tools led to a near perfect product of what was once scrap metal.  If you would like to know more about fixing your sterling silver pieces, please feel free to contact Beverly Bremer Silver Shop to talk with a member of our expert staff.
 
Beverly Bremer Silver Shop
3164 Peachtree Rd NE
Atlanta, GA 30305
800-270-4009
404-261-4009
 
 
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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Ray Shine permalink
    September 23, 2013 9:59 pm

    Is it possible to replace a broken stainless knife blade in a sterling handle? I broke a gorham chantilly knife blade in the dishwasher yesterday. What does such a repair cost?
    Thank you
    rshine@nccn.net

    • September 24, 2013 4:38 pm

      Thank you for your comment on The Silver Lining! Sorry to hear about the casualty of your meal. We do have a silversmith that picks up repairs from us once a week and does beautiful work, but to replace a knife blade can be costly – close to $90.00 or more! The blades have to be special ordered and the old blade must be removed without splitting the hollow knife handle before the repair even begins. With many patterns, you can replace the knife altogether for considerably less!

      There are three distinct sizes made in Chantilly by Gorham – luncheon, place and dinner. Measure your knife from tip to tip to determine what size you have and if it is luncheon or dinner, you will then need to determine if you have French blade or tapered! Below is the link to our Chantilly inventory with photographs.
      http://www.beverlybremer.com/sterling-silver/chantilly/gorham-inc
      Please let me know if you have any questions or wish to proceed with the repair or replacement! I look forward to hearing from you.

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